Solomon burke - that lucky old sun - how big a fool


I first saw him perform in 1984. The previous 15 years had not been kind to him or his reputation. Having arrived at Atlantic Records in 1961 just as Ray Charles was leaving, Burke enjoyed a stupendous run of hits (Cry to Me, Down in the Valley, If You Need Me, The Price) without ever delivering the solid-gone signature song that would make his name universally renowned. Years of decline followed, a period he would call "throne in exile". In 1980, when he called up Jerry Wexler to complain that The Blues Brothers movie had attributed his Everybody Needs Somebody to Love to Wilson Pickett, Atlantic's founder expressed amazement that Burke was still alive. That's how far his stock had fallen.

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Solomon Burke - That Lucky Old Sun - How Big A FoolSolomon Burke - That Lucky Old Sun - How Big A FoolSolomon Burke - That Lucky Old Sun - How Big A FoolSolomon Burke - That Lucky Old Sun - How Big A Fool

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